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Breaking News

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • Shelia Washington Dies at 61; Helped Exonerate Scottsboro Boys

    Shelia Washington read the story of the Scottsboro Boys as a teen, dedicated her life to preserving knowledge of their case, and finally spearheaded an effort that led the state of Alabama to exonerate the wrongly convicted men. 



  • The Lie at the Heart of the Western

    New novels disrupt the stories of white heroism at the heart of the Western genre and grapple with the multiethnic, violent, and exploitative history of the continent. 



  • The Campaign to Cancel Wokeness

    Columnist Michelle Goldberg examines the roots of the academic Critical Race Theory movement, and concludes that while its practitioners are sometimes willing to prioritize justice over free speech, the right today simply wants to suppress ideas it fears.



  • The Untold Story of Queer Foster Families

    by Michael Waters

    Before the legal recognition of same-sex adoptive parents, social workers around the country made decisions to place gay and lesbian teens with gay and lesbian foster parents as a humane and protective act. 



  • Some Dr. Seuss Books with Racist Imagery will Go out of Print

    The decision, which was made by Dr. Seuss Enterprises and is neither an instance of "cancellation" nor a fatal blow to the revenue generated by the late author's works, reflects growing awareness of the impact on children of ethnic stereotypes. 



  • SPLC: Over 160 Confederate Symbols Were Removed in 2020

    "The nonprofit organization, based in Montgomery, Ala., started tracking symbols of the Confederacy after a white supremacist killed nine Black worshipers at a storied African-American church in Charleston, S.C., in 2015."



  • African-American Sacrifice in the Killing Fields of France

    For their bravery in capturing Séchault from the Germans on Sept. 29, 1918, and for other combat action, the regiment known as the "Harlem Hellfighters" was awarded France’s highest military honor, the Croix de Guerre, soon after the war.